Friday, July 13, 2018

How to make a Garden Chandelier

Making a garden chandelier using a galvanised aluminum,copper watering can and Crystal teardrops
Publisher's Note:  Please note  Image(s) on this post are unrelated to the Ad links throughout. Some  third party native Ads may display related images.

These days you can actually make the perfect 
lighting fixture suited for any home decor or themed event, and the garden is no exception.
In this short post we will take a common galvanized aluminum with copper lining watering can and turn it into an illuminated garden chandelier that will sure add a pop of glam and sparkle to any outdoor space. 


Below you will see a few of the items used to repurpose this gardening tool.  

Making a garden chandelier using a galvanised aluminum,copper watering can and Crystal teardrops
In the above image you can view the gardening watering can which was an inexpensive purchase at a local home improvement store for about $16. 
What caught my attention about this item, was the ability to remove the watering head as you will see below.     

Making a garden chandelier using a galvanised aluminum,copper watering can and Crystal teardrops
The removal of the head or spout of the can allows for a greater watering flow when needed. The Head of the can is normally used when also wanting to water the plants foliage. 
Also note the generously sized pre-drilled holes that can be viewed from the inside of the head. This is key to making our desired project work, as you will see below.  

More on why this option works best for the overall outcome of the project at hand. 

Making a garden chandelier using a galvanised aluminum,copper watering can and Crystal teardrops
In the three photos above (left) shows the interior of the can and the nozzle opening  that leads up towards the cylinder and tip. the (middle) image shows the nozzle opening at the tip of the cans cylinder and the (right) image simply shows the same nozzle tip at an angled view were the watering head or spout is normally attached. 
Making a garden chandelier using a galvanised aluminum,copper watering can and Crystal teardrops
Above is a picture of the LED string lighting used for this project. We chose a 5-foot strand, but the choice is absolutely yours. In the image to the (right) we have the included battery box and switch used to operate this string light.

Note:If are going to use this project in an area that will be subject to moisture and rain, my suggestion will be to waterproof the battery box by using some clear silicone to seal any openings including the area were the fuse is covered by the plastic tubing.     

Making a garden chandelier using a galvanised aluminum,copper watering can and Crystal teardrops
Here you can view how the LED light strand have been fed through the interior nozzle opening of the can all the way up and out the watering nozzle head and or cannula.

Note: These LED strands are very inexpensive and very malleable so you can maneuver small openings as you will see in the latter images.    
Making a garden chandelier using a galvanised aluminum,copper watering can and Crystal teardrops
This next image shows how the strands were fed up and through the nozzle tip and bunched inside the watering head opening (right image),as means of having the light reflect through the pre-perforated holes, giving a nice shimmering glow to the crystal teardrops. 
Making a garden chandelier using a galvanised aluminum,copper watering can and Crystal teardrops 
Ornament hooks were used to attach the crystal garlands to the head of the watering can, by simply inserting them into the pre-perforated holes on both the garlands and the head of the can. A pair of pliers was used to twist the hooks to each other keeping them in place and then bent inward to conceal them into the head of garden can. 

Important: It is important to notice that you must first insert the LED string of lights into the head prior to attaching the garland with the ornament hooks. Inverting the steps will make it difficult for the insertion of the lights. 
Making a garden chandelier using a galvanised aluminum,copper watering can and Crystal teardrops
The head of the gardening can is now screwed back onto the nozzle (Top Left) and we have now hung the teardrops in the desired lengths to get that cascading effect. 
Now you are ready to hang this gorgeous piece anywhere you like. As you may have noticed in the images above, we chose to hang it in a roofed outdoor patio area were we grow most of the herbs bushels that require mostly shade. 
Making a garden chandelier using a galvanised aluminum,copper watering can and Crystal teardrops
Another image of this gorgeous outdoor chandelier displaying all of its shimmer and glory under the duskly, nightly skies.

Note: You may also omit the use of LED lights and simply use this piece as an outdoor suncatcher chandelier. The organic flare of the sun reflecting on the crystals will display a prism like glow of colors throughout your garden and or sunroom. 
  

Create It....Love It....Share It !

  







Tuesday, May 22, 2018

How to Repurpose a Wooden Ladder into Linen Rack

A Wooden ladder re-purposed as a Linen Rack
Publisher's Note:  Please note  Image(s) on this post are unrelated to the Ad links throughout. 
Some  third party native Ads may display related images.


In this short tutorial we will take a simple and weathered old wooden ladder and repurpose it into a practical linen rack. 
Considering that wooden ladders are very much a thing of the past,giving ways to the most ingenious metal ladder designs available on the market today, you may have to opt for looking at your local thrift shops for this forgotten relic.
A Wooden ladder re-purposed as a Towel Rack
Above are a few close up shots of the spray paint colors used to refinish this wooden ladder. We decided to go with the soft sheen of satin white and the reflective tones of the metallic chrome.
You may also notice that we decided to leave some inconspicuous areas of the ladder where the natural wood tones are shown.  
A Wooden ladder re-purposed as a Towel Rack
In the collage of images above you can see how we grouped a series of 7 towels. this particular ladder with an average height of 6 feet could easily rack 10 towels. Not to mention the top of the ladder that could also make way for extra folded towels and or rags.  

A Wooden ladder re-purposed as a Towel Rack
In the set of images above we added a few items that can also be displayed ready for use. Amongst these are body wash,sugar scrubs and aromatherapy products. 
You can chose to display any color towels of choice to match your bedroom or bathroom decor taste.    

A Wooden ladder re-purposed as a Towel Rack
On the top shelve of the ladder we were also able to place extra towels neatly folded and or bath rags, and glass jar for easy access to bath sponges and soap bars.
As you can already see, this old wooden ladder has been resurrected with new life giving it meaning and purpose. 
A Wooden ladder re-purposed as a Linen Rack
We added some gorgeous throws and scarves ready for the picking. You may choose to hang many or just a simple few adding character and punches of color to the your decor theme.  
A Wooden ladder re-purposed as a Linen Rack
In the above images you can see how it transformed from a common regular household handyman/handywoman tool to a creative, functional and integral display rack fit for any interior decor. 

Conclusion: It is needless to say that there are things in our living spaces that seem to get old and unpleasant to the sight as time goes by. Nevertheless,with a little ingenuity and "elbow grease" you can turn any old item into a piece of interior or exterior decor item that will be worthy "YOUR" space made perfect. 
Create It....Love It....Share It !


     













   

Monday, May 7, 2018

How to Remove Tarnish from Copper Pots & Pans

A Copper base cooking pot and Stainless steel cleaned with conventional ketchup
Publisher's Note:  Please note  Image(s) on this post are unrelated to the Ad links throughout. 
Some  third party native Ads may display related images.

What causes patina to form on copper ?


If you are a fan of copper cookware, then you may be concerned at times on how much effort it takes to keep these beautiful kitchen items looking their best.
The patina in copper is simply and less technically, a by-product of the metals chemically reacting to its environment by means of oxidation, hence giving it the tarnished appearance. This process in turn will yield to the change in color of the object, usually a bluish/greenish look.

Patina can also be formed on other metals such as brass. 



Patina and tarnish on a copper saucepan prior to cleaning
Above you will see a before view on how this copper pan and top has garnished quite some tarnish or patina over the last few months. 

A Copper base cooking pot and Stainless steel cleaned with conventional ketchup
Today we will use some simple household products that you may already have laying in your pantry. 
1. Mix 1 part white vinegar and 1 part water
2. Use the ketchup just as is, straight from the bottle. 
3.Spray the vinegar water mix generously onto the desired areas.
4. Apply a generous amount of ketchup onto the area and let sit until you can see the change in color taking place. As seen above you may notice how the treated side already looks a lighter, brighter color than the untreated area.     

A Copper base cooking pot and Stainless steel cleaned with conventional ketchup
Use a rag or towel paper to wipe the treated area clear of the ketchup paste. As you can already notice above, the treated area is beginning to regain its original copper luster tone.  

A Copper base cooking pot and Stainless steel cleaned with conventional ketchup
Another heavy gauge copper saucepan with stainless steel inner lining and handle using the same method used for the cover.

A Copper base cooking pot and Stainless steel cleaned with conventional ketchup
This image shows a comparison of these two  copper cookware pans, one untreated (left) and the other(right)completely treated and washed. The difference is absolutely clear, almost "mirror like" clear if you ask me. 

Please Note: you may have to repeat the steps 2 or 3 times depending on how tarnished your pots are. 

A Copper base cooking pot and Stainless steel cleaned with conventional ketchup
Another image of the same method used on a stainless steel pot with a copper bottom. To our pleasant surprise we found that the paste also brought desirable luster to the stainless steel area of the pot. 
A Copper base cooking pot and Stainless steel cleaned with conventional ketchup
We then proceeded to repeat these steps for each copper kitchen utensil. This included serving utensils, measuring cups, copper moscow mule mugs, etc. The results were an effortless almost new look.  

Please note: the longer the ketchup paste remains on the item the more of the patina or tarnish it will tend to be removed. 

Nevertheless we learned that leaving it more than 30 minutes at a time caused the paste to stick to the surface causing you to use more effort to remove it.Again, don't rush the process, but also don't just forget about the timing factor. 

When it's all said and done,the paste will  avoid you having to use a whole lot of "elbow grease" if you will. 
A Copper base cooking pot and Stainless steel cleaned with conventional ketchup
Some more views of the finished work beautifully hung on a ceiling utensil rack.
If you look closely at the photo to the right of the collage, you will notice we hung an untreated copper pan to the far left.The other two along with the measuring cups were treated only once with the ketchup paste. The difference in color is completely noticeable. 

Also notice how some of the dark patina still remains on one of the treated saucepans, as this was deliberate. 


Conclusion: This is a matter of preference. You may choose to completely remove all the patina or leave a few stains here and there. Just remember that depending on how long you have owned these, the more you will have to repeat the process.

For me personally I always enjoy watching a well aged piece of copper cookware.

The different shades in the patina even if you partially clean them, gives for a more interesting and or vintage look. 

Below we have placed a short video snippet on how this turned out ~ENJOY~

Note:Video includes CC(closed captions)

    By: JoFer Interior_SMP

As usual we welcome your comments and shared thoughts. CREATE IT...LOVE IT...SHARE IT!